Tagged: e1.5

Bulfinch’s Mythology Tales

Bulfinch’s Mythology Tales

Enjoy these tales from Bulfinch’s Mythology: The Age of Fable, by Thomas Bulfinch. Cupid and Psyche Pygmalion and Galatea Daedalus and Icarus

George Bernard Shaw, playwright

George Bernard Shaw Resources

George Bernard Shaw Resources George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) was a prolific writer who worked as an art, music, and theater critic. He found his calling writing popular plays, including Pygmalion and Saint Joan. In addition,...

Introduction to Literature Focus Texts

Introduction to Literature Focus Texts

Introduction to Literature study guide In this first level of Excellence in Literature, students will become familiar with the lesson format they’ll use through all five years of the curriculum. Introduction to Literature is...

Pygmalion: The 1938 Movie

Pygmalion: The 1938 Movie

Pygmalion is a 1938 British film starring Leslie Howard and Wendy Hiller. It is based on the play by George Bernard Shaw, and adapted by him for the screen. The film won an Oscar for best screenplay...

The Humor of G.B. Shaw and G.K. Chesterton

The Humor of G.B. Shaw and G.K. Chesterton

George Bernard Shaw and G.K. Chesterton were intellectual titans of their age, and they had a very interesting relationship. The photograph at left shows Shaw, Hilaire Belloc, and Chesterton. You can get a sense...

Pygmalion and Galatea Legend told by Thomas Bulfinch

Pygmalion and Galatea Legend told by Thomas Bulfinch

Legend of Pygmalion and Galatea as told by Thomas Bulfinch [This version of the text comes from Bulfinch’s Mythology: The Age of Fable, by Thomas Bulfinch, revised by Rev. E. E. Hale.] Pygmalion saw...

Bernard Shaw: a Brief Biography

Bernard Shaw: a Brief Biography

George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) led a long and fascinating literary life. Here is a brief biography by Cary Mazer of the University of Pennsylvania.

Shaw and the Don: G. Bernard Shaw’s Reception of Mozart’s Don Giovanni

Shaw and the Don: G. Bernard Shaw’s Reception of Mozart’s Don Giovanni

Scholars have long recognized the importance of structural aspects of Mozart’s music on George Bernard Shaw’s dramas. Here is the text of a talk given by Shaw.